Fastrack Hockey Game. Homemade!

Fastrack Hockey Game. Homemade!

How to Make a Fastrack Hockey Game

A couple weeks ago Wyatt and I found a game called “Fastrack” Hockey at a game store in Santa Monica. I’ve learned it’s also called Finger hockey.

I took a couple pictures of it because it looked so easy to build! It’s a simple, but fun and fast-paced game. Each player starts with five discs on his or her side and starts flinging them through a slot in the middle divider using an elastic cord. Whoever manages to get all ten discs on the opposite side first wins!

Fastrack hockey game. Homemade!

I cut out the frame pieces using my table saw miter sled. This makes perfect miters, but a miter saw would work well too. Or, you could skip the miters altogether and just but the ends of the boards together with glue and a couple nails or screws.

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I cut rabbets along the inside edge or each piece. These little ledges will hold the bottom. This step isn’t absolutely necessary either. You could just glue and tack the bottom directly to the underside of the frame.

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Drilling holes for the elastic cords is necessary, however. I drilled holes all the way through the long side pieces, making sure they were in the exact same position from the ends on each piece. These holes are the same diameter as the elastic cords I used.

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Once the holes were drilled, I glued the frame together using a strap clamp. Again, you can skip this stem if you didn’t make miter joints.

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Once it was dried, I cut a shallow groove all the way around the perimeter of the frame, just the width of my saw blade. This alone makes a nice decorative element, or you could make it extra fancy by filling it with inlay strips of a contrasting color. I cut mine to add a disco light!

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I cut out the discs or hockey pucks from a 1.25″ (32mm) diameter dowel using my crosscut sled.

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I cut the bottom from piece of 1/4″ (6mm) plywood. After painting it and the frame, I glued it into the rabbets.

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I cut a notch in the bottom of this board for the center divider. I did this by making multiple, repeated cuts on my table saw. The notch need to be just slightly wider and taller than a disc. I made mine 1.5″ (38mm) wide. This makes the game really fun and challenging!

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Attaching the elastic cords

The bungee cords I used have hooks attached to each end. I cut one end off and slid the hooks off. Then I could thread one end through a hole in the frame. I recessed the outsides of these holes to hide the crimped end of the elastic.

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And threaded the cut end through the opposite hole. I put a clamp on it to hold it in place while I prepared it.

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I folded over the end, tied am 18 gauge wire around it, and crimped it together with a pair of pliers.

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Finally, I glued on the center divider. Notice, I masked off areas to be glued before I painted it. Wood glue won’t adhere well on paint.

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Disco Mode!

I thought it would be fun to add a light to the game. I discovered that a light wire in my littleBits kit fits perfectly into a groove created by a saw. If you would like to experiment with littleBits, they are offering a special for WWMM viewers. Enter promo code WOODWORKING at checkout and get $20 off your first order.

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The electrical modules hook together with magnets.

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I added a pulse module, and adjusted its flashing speed to create a disco effect!

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Nighttime play!

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Free Plans

 

 

 

3 COMMENTS

  1. Great project, my grandson will love beating grandpa. I think I’ll make the disc opposing colors. Thanks again for another fun project, I have made lots of your projects, keep them up.

  2. Steve, I always look forward to your videos for several reasons. I hope you don’t take offense when I say that one thing I look forward to the most are your weekly GRR-Ripper jokes. Do you wake up in the middle of the night in cold sweats when you come up with inspiration for them? Kidding of course. Really cool project, and the video was informative and entertaining as always. Thank you for your inspiration!

    • Haha..Thanks Antoine. It’s funny, because those Microjig bits are always the very last thing I shoot. I never plan them out. Just try to come up with something that is either somehow related to the video or topical.

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